Günümüzden 2000 yıl önce Söke ovası tamamen bir deniz, Bafa gölü de bir koy şeklinde idi. Bu deniz kenarlarında antik çağın en güzel kentlerinden Milet, Priene ve Didim yer alıyordu. Büyük Menderes Irmağı ( Maiandros ) zamanla taşıdığı alüvyonlar ile; ilk önce Priene önündeki denizi daha sonrada Milet ve Lade Adası'nı da içine alan tüm bölgeyi doldurmuştur.
Aynı dönemlerde Efes' de deniz kenarında iken, zamanla ön tarafı dolarak günümüzde ki halini almıştır.


(3a) AR Lydo-Milesian 1/12 Stater (1.18 g) · Right-facing Group

This group includes specimens showing the lion’s protome left with head reverted to face right.
RJO 1. Silver 1/12 stater (1.23 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head right. Reverse: incuse sun ornament.

RJO 9. Silver 1/12 stater (1.06 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head right. Reverse: incuse sun ornament, with swelling in one corner.

RJO 13. Silver 1/12 stater (1.12 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head right. Reverse: incuse sun ornament, with swelling in one corner.

RJO 14. Silver 1/12 stater (1.27 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head right. Reverse: incuse sun ornament.

RJO 38. Silver 1/12 stater (1.03 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head right. Reverse: incuse sun ornament.

RJO 39. Silver 1/12 stater (1.25 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head right. Reverse: incuse sun ornament, with M-shaped swelling in one corner.

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RJO 113. Silver 1/12 stater (1.22 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head right with dotted truncation to protome and a representation of the tail also visible. Reverse: incuse sun ornament, with swelling in one corner. See the FORVM Ancient Coins bulletin board for an extended discussion of the remarkable style of this coin’s obverse. Is it authentically ancient, or could it be a modern replica or imitation?

(3b) AR Lydo-Milesian 1/12 Stater (1.18 g) · Left-facing Group

As with the previous right-facing group, these specimens actually depict a lion protome rather than just a head, and so this left-facing group may be more fully described as showing “a lion protome right with head reverted to face left.”
RJO 3. Silver 1/12 stater (1.16 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head left. Reverse: incuse sun ornament.

RJO 6. Silver 1/12 stater (1.02 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head left. Reverse: incuse sun ornament.

RJO 19. Silver 1/12 stater (1.12 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head left. Reverse: incuse sun ornament, with swelling in one corner.

RJO 20. Silver 1/12 stater (1.18 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head left. Reverse: incuse sun ornament.

RJO 22. Silver 1/12 stater (1.11 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head left. Reverse: incuse sun ornament.

RJO 27. Silver 1/12 stater (1.04 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head left. Reverse: incuse sun ornament, with asymmetrical center lines. This asymmetrical reverse appears to be identical to that seen on one specimen in the Kayhan collection (Konuk, 2002: #487; same die?).

RJO 40. Silver 1/12 stater (1.07 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head left. Reverse: incuse sun ornament.

(3c) AR Lydo-Milesian 1/12 Stater (1.18 g) · Fourrées and Possible Fourrées

One possible and two certain fourrées of this type are included in the collection. I can find no published record of Milesian twelfth-stater fourrées, but their existence is not surprising, since the invention of counterfeiting was virtually coeval with the invention of coinage. Of the certain fourrées, one specimen faces right and the other faces left.
RJO 2. Silver or fourrée 1/12 stater (0.94 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head right? Reverse: incuse sun ornament. This coin has a smooth surface that doesn’t give the impression of ordinary wear, and while there is some porosity it seems to be confined to an inner layer, while the surface itself, where intact, is not porous. There is not a striking color difference, however, between the ‘interior’ and the exterior. Could this be a contemporary fourrée? (See also detail a and detail b which suggest a solid covering on a porous core.)

RJO 28. Fourrée 1/12 stater (1.09 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head right. Reverse: incuse sun ornament, with swelling in one corner. This coin is a clear fourrée, with a dark (lead?) core and silver plating which has partly worn off.

RJO 54. Fourrée 1/12 stater (1.05 g), about 500 BC. Obverse: lion’s head left. Reverse: incuse sun ornament. This coin is a clear fourrée, with a dark (lead?) core and silver plating which has partly worn off.

(3d) AR Lydo-Milesian 1/24 Stater (0.59 g)

This interesting specimen is clearly of the same general type as the common Milesian twelfth staters described above, but it appears to be a twenty-fourth stater. Klein describes a single twenty-fourth stater of this type (1999: #428, 0.66 g), but I can find no other published examples. Is this specimen contemporary with the Milesian twelfths above?
RJO 88. Silver 1/48 stater (0.61 g), about 500 BC? Obverse: lion’s head left. Reverse: incuse sun ornament.

(3e) AR Lydo-Milesian 1/48 Stater (0.29 g) · Unique Denomination?

This very interesting specimen is clearly of the same general type as the common Milesian twelfth staters described above, but I can find no published examples of a forty-eighth stater of this type. Is this specimen contemporary with the Milesian twelfths above, or is it perhaps a later Carian imitation similar to SNG Kayhan #864–866 (Konuk, 2002)? The lion on this coin does have the short and somewhat bulbous snout more common in Carian designs.
RJO 42. Silver 1/48 stater (0.28 g), about 500 BC? Obverse: lion’s head left. Reverse: incuse sun ornament.